Saturday, November 16, 2013

From homeless man to sharply dressed exec

This Veteran's Day donate to Degage Ministries to help other homeless veterans.

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No wonder this guy can't find love

Wedding photographer Romeo Rose tries to explain a very specific personal ad calling for his dream girl.

Romeo Rose has come under fire for posting a series of inflammatory tweets. Romeo Rose has come under fire for posting a series of inflammatory tweets. Source: Supplied

Romeo Rose in action. Romeo Rose in action. Source: Supplied

NO WONDER this guy can't find love.

An American photographer who made headlines for his brash requirements for the perfect girlfriend has done it again, but this time he's taken aim at women, homosexuals and black people in a series of inflammatory tweets that's quickly given him the reputation as the world's worst wedding photographer - and potentially the world's worst human.

Overnight, Larry Busby, aka Romeo Rose, posted a series of rants describing rape as a "womens (sic) fantasy" and that they "put themselves in that position then whine about it later".

Prepare yourself.

A screengrab of Romeo's vile Twitter rant before his profile was suspended. Picture: Twitter @RomeoRosePhotos A screengrab of Romeo's vile Twitter rant before his profile was suspended. Picture: Twitter @RomeoRosePhotos Source: Supplied

And it didn't end there.

************

It's no surprise that not soon after, the Twitterverse began to react. Yet he refused to admit he was a troll and a racist.

************

************

His account was suspended at approximately 11:30am AEST, but he posted on his Facebook page soon after: "just because you get a acct (sic) suspended or removed does not mean you will ever change the way I think or shut me up from voicing my opinions".

He returned under the Twitter handle @SleeplessNATX, describing himself as a "living legend & icon", but Twitter was quick to react and the profile has already been suspended.

He also made the shock announcement that he would be running for Mayor of Austin, Texas, at the next election, claiming he'll "get rid of all hippys (sic), liberals, potheads, blacks, gays and feminists".

But considering he doesn't have enough money to pay for his electricity bill, we have a feeling pigs will fly before he reaches the dizzying heights of politics.

That's karma for you.

Picture: Facebook/Romeo Rose Picture: Facebook/Romeo Rose Source: Supplied

Continue the conversation via Twitter @the_mattyoung


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Friday, November 15, 2013

You are way dirtier than you think you are

Your hygiene habits are way worse than you think. Picture: Thinkstock Your hygiene habits are way worse than you think. Picture: Thinkstock Source: Supplied

BACTERIA and faecal matter. They're everywhere.

It doesn't matter how many times you wash your hands, launder your clothes or clean your bathroom. You're probably still covered in them.

The Huffington Post has put together a list of disgusting facts that show you why your hygiene habits "are way worse than you think".

Washing your clothes doesn't get them clean

University of Arizona research found that washing one load of underwear can transfer 100 million E. coli into the water, and into the next load you do.

Microbiology professor Charles Gerba, who conducted the research, told ABC: "There's about a tenth of a gram of poop in the average pair of underwear."

To combat the problem make sure you take your laundry out of the machine as soon as its finished, or bacteria will multiply in the dark, damp conditions.

Washing dishes is disgusting

The kitchen sink is less hygienic than a toilet bowl, according to Eileen Abruzzo, the director of infection control at Long Island College Hospital of Brooklyn. Dirty plates and soaking pots are the perfect breeding ground for E. coli and salmonella.

There could be faeces on your toothbrush

Flushing a toilet without closing the lid causes faecal matter to fly into the air. Dr Gerba compared it to "the Fourth of July" fireworks, The Atlantic reported. And the particles can travel up to 1.8 metres, which is bad news if your toothbrush is in range.

There is no such thing as the "five second rule"

Clemson University researchers found that food picks up 99 per cent of bacteria are soon as it hits the ground. "The five-second rule probably should become the zero-second rule," says Dr. Roy M. Gulick, chief of the division of infectious diseases at Weill Cornell Medical College. Carpets and wet floors harbour more bacteria than hard floors. Salty and sugary foods take longer to pick up bacteria.

To read the full list, go to the Huffington Post.


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Why your kids need device curfews

Experts warn parents are risking their children's physical and mental well-being by allowing so much screen time and inter Experts warn parents are risking their children's physical and mental well-being by allowing so much screen time and interaction with online activities. (File picture) Source: News Limited

TECH-savvy kids now spend more time online or watching TV than they do at school and should be put on a "media diet'' of two hours a day, paediatricians warned.

Doctors have been advised to start grilling parents about their kids' online habits to prevent obesity, bullying and sexual problems.

Australian paediatricians are backing new guidance issued by the American Academy of Paediatrics, which urges parents to impose a "curfew'' for smartphones, and discourage babies and toddlers from watching any TV.

Australian Medical Association president Steve Hambleton said children were growing obese because they spend too much time sitting in front of screens.

Experts say very young children shouldn't watch TV at all, and others need to be put on media diets along with things like Experts say very young children shouldn't watch TV at all, and others need to be put on media diets along with things like smartphone or device curfews. (File picture)

He also warned that kids were watching pornography and violence on smart phones.

"It's disturbing normal sexual development,'' he told News Corp.

"Girls feel they have to act like porn actors and boys think they want to be treated that way.''

Dr Hambleton urged parents to ban TVs and the internet from kids' bedrooms.

The new US guide says the average 8 to 10-year-old spends nearly eight hours a day with media, while teenagers spent up to 11 hours a day online or watching TV.

"Young people now spend more time with media than they do in school,'' it says.

"It is the leading activity for children and teenagers other than sleeping.''

The guide advises GPs to ask parents during kids' health check-ups about how much time their children spend in front of screens, and whether they have a TV, computer, tablet or smart phone in their rooms.

And it suggests kids be placed on a "media diet'' of two hours a day.

The lead author of the American guide, Professor Victor Strasburger, said children should not be allowed to watch the internet alone in their rooms.

He said he could guarantee that if a 14-year-old boy had internet access in his room, "he is looking at pornography''.

"Keep technology out of the bedroom,'' Professor Strasburger told News Corp from New Mexico.

"You cannot control what kids are seeing or how much time they spend online if they are wired in their bedrooms.

"When I was growing up, 'Go to your room' was a punishment but now it's a technological vacation.''

Professor Strasburger said he was concerned about the impact of online porn on teenagers' sexual development.

"Forty years ago the worst thing a 14-year-old could get into was Playboy magazine,'' he said.

"But sex online differs from a magazine, and we do such a poor job of sex education at home and in school that media has filled the gap.''

Professor Strasburger, a US adolescent medicine expert who has worked at the Sydney Children's Hospital, said babies and toddlers exposed to television before the age of two were slower to start speaking.

"They can learn from you as a person, but not from a person on the TV screen,'' he said.

The Paediatric and Child Health Division of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians yesterday backed the new US advice.

Its president-elect, Dr Nicki Murdock, said children were using smart phones to bully other kids, take videos of other children or themselves, and watch pornography.

"Children don't realise they're opening themselves up to regret and threat,'' she said.

"Pornography and inappropriate content is freely available on the internet and some parents are not tech-savvy to block the child's access.

"And when children are using computers or watching TV it means they are not going outside running around and riding their bikes.''

Dr Murdock agreed it would be a "good idea'' for doctors to ask parents about their children's media use during health checks.

###


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Thursday, November 14, 2013

Is buying bottled water like buying air?

It takes 6000 glasses of tap water to equal the cost of a single bottle of water. Picture: Thinkstock It takes 6000 glasses of tap water to equal the cost of a single bottle of water. Picture: Thinkstock Source: Supplied

Hilarious campaign pokes fun at consumers6000 glasses of water equal cost of one bottleVisit the Choose Tap Facebook pageFind out more on the Choose Tap campaign

"IT'S KIND of like buying bottled water."

That's the message from Yarra Valley Water in this ad campaign, Choose Tap, that pokes fun at consumers by comparing buying bottled water to buying air.

The aim is to promote the use and health benefits of drinking tap water after figures revealed it takes 6000 glasses from the tap to equal the cost of a single bottle of water.

The campaign, which was filmed in a real store in Melbourne, centres on a fictional brand, Dupé (pronounced due•pey), selling a variety of strange products such as 'February Moonlight', 'Vintage Compliments From Nanna' and their signature product, 'Organic Fresh Air', all at incredibly high prices.

The reactions of customers were filmed by a hidden camera.

Australians spend big bucks on bottled water, more than $500 million a year, "which is not only putting greater strain on the environment, it's an expense we could easily avoid," says Yarra Valley Water's website.


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Bird flu kills 13 in Cambodia this year

CHINA-HEALTH-FLU Cambodia's latest bird flu victim was a young boy who became sick after tending to a group of chickens that died suddenly. Source: AFP

CAMBODIAN authorities say a 10-year-old boy has become the country's 13th person to die of bird flu this year.

Cambodia's Health Ministry and the World Health Organisation said in a joint statement that the boy died from the H5N1 bird flu virus on Saturday after suffering from fever, cough, a sore throat and breathing difficulty.

Cambodia's 13 bird flu fatalities and 24 confirmed cases are the country's highest annual total since the virus surfaced in 2003, and also the highest for any country this year for the H5N1 variant.

The H5N1 virus normally spreads between poultry, but can sometimes spread from poultry to humans.

The statement said that about a month before the boy became sick, about 30 chickens died suddenly in his village and that he helped carry them.


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Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Meth boom sweeping Asia: UN

Asia methamphetamine Thai police guard packages containing about two million methamphetamine pills. Seizures of crystal meth and methamphetamine pills reached record highs in East and Southeast Asia in 2012. Picture: Sakchai Lalit Source: AP

The United Nations has sounded the alarm over record seizures of methamphetamine across much of Asia as the illegal drug floods streets and clubs.

Last year, 227 million methamphetamine pills were seized in East and Southeast Asia - up 59 per cent from the year before and a more than seven-fold increase compared with 2008, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) said on Friday.

"If you look at the five-year trends, since 2008 the seizures have increased pretty exponentially," said UNODC regional analyst Shawn Kelley, who said data suggest the trend has continued into 2013.

He said the "huge spike" was the result of increased efforts by law enforcement agencies as well as soaring production in Myanmar and an increase in the smuggling of drugs into Asia from other regions.

Seizures of potent crystal meth also increased, jumping 12-fold in Myanmar, 10-fold in Brunei, 91 per cent in Hong Kong, 75 per cent in both Indonesia and Cambodia, and 33 per cent in Japan.

In its pill form, methamphetamine - known in Thailand as "yaba", which means "crazy medicine" - is used both as a party drug and pick-me-up for those working long hours.

Between them China, Thailand, Myanmar and Laos seized 99 per cent of all yaba in East and Southeast Asia, according to the UNODC report.

Asia Record Meth Year A 2013 poster of the varieties of Myanmar-made methamphetamine pills hangs in the office of the Anti-Narcotic Task Force at Yangon's domestic airport. Picture: Jocelyn Gecker

All countries showed significant increases on a year earlier, with Thai authorities netting 95.3 million pills - a 93 per cent increase - while Chinese seizures rose 25 per cent to 102.2 million and Myanmar's more than tripled to 18.2 million.

Much of the methamphetamine seized in Thailand is thought to be produced in neighbouring Myanmar.

Before the country began opening up to the world under a new reformist government in 2011, it was believed that rebels were increasing drug production to buy weapons amid tensions with the then-ruling junta.

"But now it's still going on," said Kelley, despite ceasefire deals between Myanmar's new quasi-civilian government and many of the armed ethnic minority groups.

The drug is mostly made in isolated mobile laboratories hidden in the forests of Shan State in eastern Myanmar, which is also the second-largest global source of opium after Afghanistan.

But at least one major "fairly sophisticated large lab" was discovered in 2012, with quantities of meth suggesting "industrial production", said Kelley, adding that some well-organised groups had financing from outside the country.

In Thailand, the use of methamphetamine has become a major public health issue, said Kelley, with signs that traffickers are pushing "promotional sales" of the more potent crystal meth to develop the market.

The country saw a 63 per cent increase in people admitted for treatment for yaba last year, to 245,920. The number of those given help for crystal meth, while still smaller at 16,500, was more than double the previous year.


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Stressed? More heading to the shops

Foodbank general manager Ken McMillan launches the 2013/2014 annual donation drive in partnership with Quest Community Newspapers, Retail First shopping centres and All Purpose.

Easing the stress by shopping is increasing ... Lorraine Harrison and Kellie Fraser love their new shoes. Picture: Russell Brown Easing the stress by shopping is increasing ... Lorraine Harrison and Kellie Fraser love their new shoes. Picture: Russell Brown. Source: News Limited

MORE Australians are turning to retail therapy to manage their stress, according to a new survey of the nation's well-being.

While watching television and movies and spending time with family remain the most popular stress relievers, the proportion of Australians trawling a shopping mall increased from 47 per cent to 60 per cent between 2011 and 2013.

And more than two thirds who went shopping to relieve stress this year rated it as an effective stress management strategy.

But Professor Lyn Littlefield, head of the Australian Psychological Society which conducted the survey, warned while shopping and watching movies distracts people from their problems, it doesn't solve them.

"In the short term they are effective but they are not a long-term solution," she said.

"When you come home from shopping it becomes very hollow the next day," she said.

The results of the online survey of 1,548 people conducted by the society suggests stress could be a factor in the nation's obesity crisis.

Three out of four people report they eat something to deal with stress, up from 69 per cent in 2011.

Eating something to cope with stress was rated as only 55 per cent effective compared to 85 per cent who rated spending time with family as effective.

This is probably because the survey also found that the pressure to maintain a healthy lifestyle was the fourth most common cause of stress.

The media was rife with reports on the problem of obesity and the need to eat well and exercise and people who struggled to do this felt inadequate, Professor Littlefield said.

DO YOU RELEASE STRESS BY SHOPPING? TELL US MORE BELOW

The computer has emerged as a counsellor with almost one in two people (49%) turning to social networking sites to cope with stress, up from 37 per cent in 2011.

Finances and family issues remain the nation's top causes of stress but for one in three workers their job is a source of stress.

Only half the nation's workers feel valued by their boss and job satisfaction is on the decline the survey found.

Workplace stress was worst for those aged 36-55 with one in two people in this age group suffering stress from their job.

The global financial downturn and redundancies in many workplaces worried those who still had a job and they may also be working harder as a result of workplace downsizing, Professor Littlefield said.

More than one in three of those surveyed reported depression and one in seven had severe depression.

Family issues top stressor for women, finances top stressor for men

Stress was so bad for seven in ten people they said it was affecting them physically.

Those who found their problems overwhelming to the point where they could not turn up at work or leave their homes could get help from a psychologist.

Psychologists had strategies to break problems down into smaller chunks so it could be deal with gradually, Professor Littlefield said.


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Weight losers rewarded with gold

Obesity Dubai Hussain Nasser Lootah, Director General of Dubai Municipality, presents Syrian architect Ahmad al-Sheikh, 27, with the top award in a weight loss competition in Dubai. Picture: Karim Sahib Source: AFP

DUBAI municipality has dished out 2.8 million dirhams ($809,874) in gold in prizes to contestants in a weight-loss challenge, an initiative by the Gulf emirate to fight obesity.

The "Your Weight in Gold" campaign promised one gram of gold for each kilogram shed, provided the contestants lost at least two kilos by August 16, when the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan ended.

Ahmad al-Sheikh, a 27-year-old Syrian architect, claimed the top prize of 63 grams of gold worth 10,048 dirhams after losing 26 kilos.

Sheikh, who weighed 146.7 kilos at the start of the competition, was one of 2648 winners who together received 16.82 kilos of gold on Thursday.

"I actually registered 15 days later in the campaign and was worried at first, because I thought I lost a head start to all the other contestants," he told the Gulf News daily.

The second and third place winners shed 23 kilos and 22 kilos, respectively.

During Ramadan, the faithful refrain from eating, drinking and smoking between dawn and sunset.

Dubai obesity The participants in 'Your Weight in Gold' during the final weigh-in. Contestants were promised one gram of gold for every kilogram shed. Picture: Karim Sahib

But many tend to tuck in heartily after dark, despite warnings that overindulgence can be bad for the health.

Many Gulf countries are struggling to reduce the level of obesity among their populations.


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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Boy's awesome note reveals perfect survival tips

Don't run away. Picture: ThinkStock. Don't run away. Picture: ThinkStock. Source: Supplied

THIS little boy hasn't even run away yet but already he's broken one of his main rules: "Don't let anyone see this".

That was point #32 on an extensive list written by a nine-year-old planning his perfect getaway - and how to survive on the lam.

In this awesome series of notes uploaded by Imgur user vwbrenna, the boy known as Jack plots every last detail of his runaway fantasy, stuff.co.nz reports.

And he kid's certainly got an imagination.

Take for instance tip #14: "try to find a new family" and tip #21: "act normal".

Then there are the repeated reminders to use bird's nest as kindling in any fire he'll create along the way.

But at least he's healthy; Jack's #1 tip is this: "Bring lots of food, no junk food". Picture: Imgur Picture: Imgur Source: Supplied

Picture: Imgur Picture: Imgur Source: Supplied

Picture: Imgur Picture: Imgur Source: Supplied

Picture: Imgur Picture: Imgur Source: Supplied

Picture: Imgur Picture: Imgur Source: Supplied

Picture: Imgur Picture: Imgur Source: Supplied

Picture: Imgur Picture: Imgur Source: Supplied

Picture: Imgur Picture: Imgur Source: Supplied


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Tassie workers' amazing feat

Active Education Department Education Department employees -- including, from left, Jodie Bruun, Bec Campton, Lyn Metcalfe and Karen Jones -- have blitzed the opposition in the Global Corporate Challenge. Picture: Nikki Davis-Jones Source: Mercury

FITTER, healthier and more productive, Tasmania's education employees are on top of the world.

Department of Education workers have beaten thousands of international counterparts by being named the world's most active government organisation.

The 602 employees who took part in the Global Corporate Challenge aimed for 10,000 steps per day -- which could be achieved walking, running, cycling or swimming.

Four out of five exceeded the benchmark.

The average was 12,934 steps a day, far beyond the unhealthy 3000 of an average worker.

The challenge was attempted by 1200 companies worldwide, involving 262,000 employees.

Education staff beat 118 government agencies in the 12-month initiative, which encourages a gradual change in behaviour and attitudes.

"Employees benefited personally as well, 86 per cent said they now thought of exercise more positively and 67 per cent said they had more energy," GCC chief executive officer Tom Sermon said.

"Employees said exercise had decreased their stress and improved their productivity."

The GCC aims to help businesses and employees by ensuring they arrive each day in the right physical and mental shape.

Department corporate services deputy director Andrew Finch said staff who had done the GCC reported that they lost weight and felt fitter and healthier.

"There is significant evidence that healthy staff provide social and economic benefits to organisations and the community generally, such as reduced absenteeism from illness and injury, greater productivity at work, reduced health care costs and a more satisfied work force," Mr Finch said.

Tomorrow is the 15th annual Walk to Work Day, which encourages Australians to build walking into their daily routine.

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Monday, November 11, 2013

Six drinks that will make every party

le georges SO it's true - the beautiful people get the best tables at restaurants while the homely are pushed into the dark  corners.  

Cidar HERE are some of the perfect drinks to help you get through those lazy days by the pool or in one of the many beer gardens scattered across the country.   

Bottoms up: What kind of drinker are you? DRINKING alcohol is a part of almost every event these days, so research has investigated drinker behaviours and found the four types of drinkers.

The foods most likely to give you food poisoning CHICKEN and seafood always get the blame for food poisoning, but it's more likely the culprit was one of these seemingly harmless items.

Cidar Cool, refreshing drinks are the name of the game this silly season. Source: Supplied

THE more refreshing the better is the key when choosing your drop of poison to help get you through the sizzling summer which expects to see the mercury reach sky high proportions across the country.

It’s all about fresh fruit with splashes of vibrancy and heaps of fun in your drinks this season to quench your thirst without feeling that sickly and bloated sensation. Here are some of the perfect alcoholic drinks to help you get through those lazy days by the pool, at a picnic or BBQ or in one of many beer gardens.  This is too easy to make (and drink!) at home and will also transport you back to your childhood. All you do is blend 100 grams of frozen raspberries, 100 grams of sugar, 200ml of still water and two whole lemons then sieve the combo a couple times and throw in a bottle or two of your favourite sparkling wine. “It’s gorgeous and it’s a beautiful pink colour,” Gastronomy event caterer Miccal Cummins said. “It’s super easy - a couple of long straws and off you go.” Cider has undergone a massive transformation from a tacky British tipple to the fastest growing alcoholic beverage in Australia boasting a 35 per cent rise in sales in the past year. Keystone Group bars manager Jason Williams said cider has particularly filled the gap for those women who never got into beer.“The category will keep evolving and expand in terms of its range – there are new brands coming out every day,” he said. “It goes beautiful with food but you’ll also see people smashing them in cans as well.” One of the many brands new to the Australian market is Stassen cider which is created from 100 per cent crushed fruit.The juice is extracted in cider presses and fermented using champagne or wine yeast. The Belgian line comes in sweet apple, delicate pear, juicy red fruits and zesty elderflower and lime with no other additives – perfect for those stinking days.Once upon a time it was perceived as a nanna’s drink - now gin has managed to slowly but surely push vodka off the liquor shelf. Williams said gin fell off the radar when vodka reigned supreme in the 80s and 90s but new products has created a resurgence in the good ole fashioned G & T. “People have grown out of vodka to a certain extent,” he said. “New gin products have modern vibrant fun flavours which are a bit more versatile that work with tonic, soda or a cocktail especially in the warmer months.”Drinks Pink, fruity and cool, these drinks will keep everyone happy this summer. Source: Supplied

Chef and restauranteur Stefano Manfredi says you can’t go past a truly traditional Italiano spritzer to cool you down on a hot day. “It’s a beautiful summer drink,” he said. “It’s really refreshing with bitterness from the Aperol or Campari which is important because it takes your thirst away.” Ideally use four parts Prosecco, if not any bottle of sparkling wine, two to three parts Aperol or Campari and one part water or ice.The pink sweetness in a bottle has really taken off with Moscato becoming the fastest growing wine variety in Australia as sales increased 18 per cent in the past year. The drop goes hand in hand with summer matching well with barbecued meats, salads and cheese platters. Banrock Station has just released a Red variety which displays ripe berry flavours with a fun fairy floss twist. Nothing can go past an ice cold beer at the end of a long summer’s day, but stubbies and tinnies are being shafted for the boom in craft beers. Cooks Notebook blogger Mel Kettle says the boutique labels are an ever growing market that just keeps on giving. “Most people are sick of the main breweries producing fairly bland and tasteless beers,” she said. 

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Bottoms up: What kind of drinker are you?

What kind of drinker are you? What kind of drinker are you? Source: ThinkStock

DRINKING is a huge part of the Australian culture.

Just look at the images that surfaced in the wake of this week's Melbourne Cup for proof.

Most race-goers spent the day with one - or several - drinks in their hand, and there were quite a few punters who finished the day face down on the grass, retching. Not really a classy look.

This Melbourne Cup punter might have had a bit too much. This Melbourne Cup punter might have had a bit too much. Source: AAP

A research study from the RMIT University has investigated the role that alcohol plays in Australian culture. Researchers interviewed thousands of alcohol drinkers in Victoria to reveal four 'drinking types'.

The question is, which type of drinker are you?

"Heavy drinking is viewed as acceptable in almost all social situations, from weddings to sports matches, and even at funerals or baby showers," stated the research report. "There are very few occasions where drinking alcohol is not encouraged."

A bit of sport with your booze? A bit of sport with your booze? Source: ThinkStock

The report found that our "society's inherent and deeply embedded drinking culture makes most people feel they need a specific reason not to drink, rather than a reason to drink."

The research matched people's personal values, motives and lifestyle factors with the frequency of their alcohol consumption, and found that certain factors corresponded with people who drink greater amounts of alcohol.

So, what are the four types of drinkers and which one are you? The full research report from Victoria Health gives us the run down.

The Initiator likes to have fun ... with alcohol of course. The Initiator likes to have fun ... with alcohol of course. Source: ThinkStock

THE INITIATOR: "I drink what I want and I know what I'm doing."

Initiators comprise of 40 per cent of the drinking population. Typically they:

- are outgoing and the 'life of the party'

- love to have a drink and 'let loose'

- like to be an expert on alcohol brands

- are spontaneous and love to make things happen

- drink to have fun

- like to go out and drink at bars and clubs and meet people

- can sometimes be a booze bully

The Follower is influenced by the enthusiasm of Initiators around them. The Follower is influenced by the enthusiasm of Initiators around them. Source: ThinkStock

THE FOLLOWER: "When I do drink, I wish I could stop at just one or two ..."

Followers make up 13 per cent of the drinking population. They are usually:

- fun, social and easy-going

- influenced by social and cultural pressures

- persuaded join in or go with the flow

- swept up in the moment and enjoyment of social situations

- inclined to drink at home with friends and family

Moderators enjoy a drink over dinner. Moderators enjoy a drink over dinner. Source: ThinkStock

THE MODERATOR: "I choose not to drink much. I like to have a drink with friends over dinner, then go home at a decent hour."

Moderators are a surprising 26 per cent of the drinking population. They are generally:

- self-disciplined and self-sufficient

- relaxed and prefer a more chilled-out experience

- confident about saying 'no'

- inclined to have a glass or two, but that's it

- happiest when drinking at home

The Protector is like your guardian angel. The Protector is like your guardian angel. Source: ThinkStock

THE PROTECTOR: "Not having a drink when others are drinking doesn't bother me."

Protectors represent 21 per cent of drinkers. They typically:

- are controlled and conscientious

- enjoy having fun in a safe environment

- look out for others when socialising

- are not overly interested in drinking alcohol

- are the designated driver

Think you know which type of drinker you are? Comment below or join the conversation on Twitter @newscomauHQ | @gracekoelma | @VicHealth

Take the 'what kind of drinker are you?' quiz here.

###


View the original article here

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Bottoms up: What kind of drinker are you?

What kind of drinker are you? What kind of drinker are you? Source: ThinkStock

DRINKING is a huge part of the Australian culture.

Just look at the images that surfaced in the wake of this week's Melbourne Cup for proof.

Most race-goers spent the day with one - or several - drinks in their hand, and there were quite a few punters who finished the day face down on the grass, retching. Not really a classy look.

This Melbourne Cup punter might have had a bit too much. This Melbourne Cup punter might have had a bit too much. Source: AAP

A research study from the RMIT University has investigated the role that alcohol plays in Australian culture. Researchers interviewed thousands of alcohol drinkers in Victoria to reveal four 'drinking types'.

The question is, which type of drinker are you?

"Heavy drinking is viewed as acceptable in almost all social situations, from weddings to sports matches, and even at funerals or baby showers," stated the research report. "There are very few occasions where drinking alcohol is not encouraged."

A bit of sport with your booze? A bit of sport with your booze? Source: ThinkStock

The report found that our "society's inherent and deeply embedded drinking culture makes most people feel they need a specific reason not to drink, rather than a reason to drink."

The research matched people's personal values, motives and lifestyle factors with the frequency of their alcohol consumption, and found that certain factors corresponded with people who drink greater amounts of alcohol.

So, what are the four types of drinkers and which one are you? The full research report from Victoria Health gives us the run down.

The Initiator likes to have fun ... with alcohol of course. The Initiator likes to have fun ... with alcohol of course. Source: ThinkStock

THE INITIATOR: "I drink what I want and I know what I'm doing."

Initiators comprise of 40 per cent of the drinking population. Typically they:

- are outgoing and the 'life of the party'

- love to have a drink and 'let loose'

- like to be an expert on alcohol brands

- are spontaneous and love to make things happen

- drink to have fun

- like to go out and drink at bars and clubs and meet people

- can sometimes be a booze bully

The Follower is influenced by the enthusiasm of Initiators around them. The Follower is influenced by the enthusiasm of Initiators around them. Source: ThinkStock

THE FOLLOWER: "When I do drink, I wish I could stop at just one or two ..."

Followers make up 13 per cent of the drinking population. They are usually:

- fun, social and easy-going

- influenced by social and cultural pressures

- persuaded join in or go with the flow

- swept up in the moment and enjoyment of social situations

- inclined to drink at home with friends and family

Moderators enjoy a drink over dinner. Moderators enjoy a drink over dinner. Source: ThinkStock

THE MODERATOR: "I choose not to drink much. I like to have a drink with friends over dinner, then go home at a decent hour."

Moderators are a surprising 26 per cent of the drinking population. They are generally:

- self-disciplined and self-sufficient

- relaxed and prefer a more chilled-out experience

- confident about saying 'no'

- inclined to have a glass or two, but that's it

- happiest when drinking at home

The Protector is like your guardian angel. The Protector is like your guardian angel. Source: ThinkStock

THE PROTECTOR: "Not having a drink when others are drinking doesn't bother me."

Protectors represent 21 per cent of drinkers. They typically:

- are controlled and conscientious

- enjoy having fun in a safe environment

- look out for others when socialising

- are not overly interested in drinking alcohol

- are the designated driver

Think you know which type of drinker you are? Comment below or join the conversation on Twitter @newscomauHQ | @gracekoelma | @VicHealth

Take the 'what kind of drinker are you?' quiz here.

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The best rejection letter of all time

Love is a battlefield, kid. Love is a battlefield, kid. Source: ThinkStock

Ashley knows the score. Ashley knows the score. Source: imgur

IN THE battlefield of love, you have to admire someone with a game plan.

And if this hand-scrawled note passed between elementary school students is anything to go by, maybe kids have got the whole ruthless game worked out.

The note was discovered recently in a box of old school projects and uploaded to reddit.

It tells the adorable story of a schoolboy and the girl of his dreams, Ashley.

We don't know how old they are, except that they were in primary school when the adorable exchange went down.

The boy bravely sends a note to Ashley, asking her to please be his girlfriend - bonus points for the awesome manners, kid.

Sadly, Ashley rejects his chivalrous advances.

But it seems she's got her love life mapped out very thoroughly (and hilariously) and the young Romeo should keep his hopes high. Chin up, champ!

By the way, if you wonder how single people ever found love before Tinder, this is it. Go write a note to your crush today, people.

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