Saturday, November 30, 2013

Federal government boosts digital strategy with mobile apps, security programs

By Chantal Tode

May 29, 2013

SaferBus

The White House is talking up a series of recent mobile initiatives designed to more efficiently and effectively connect Americans with government, including mobile security guidelines and a mobile application development program.


These developments reflect the growing role that mobile is playing in people?s lives and the government?s strategy to deliver information anywhere, anytime and on any device. The news was revealed by the White House on the year anniversary of the release of its Digital Government Strategy and is meant to build on that strategy.


A blog post introducing the mobile initiatives addressed how open government data that is publicly accessible in easy-to-use formats can fuel innovation and economic growth.



App development
One way that the government is embracing mobile is through the release of hundreds of APIs that can be used by private-sector developers to create new applications and services.


These APIs encompass government datasets such as home and business energy trends, real-time earthquake notifications around the world and the current weather on Mars transmitted from the Curiosity Rover.


 


To facilitate the creation of new apps, each government agency has released its own developer pages and Data.gov launched a government-wide API directory so these resources are easier to find and use.


These moves were further supported by President Obama?s recently executive order and open data policy making open and machine-readable the new default for government data.


The federal government also created the Mobile Application Development Program to help agencies launch mobile apps.


Mobile analytics
The government is also focused on optimizing federal Web sites for mobile devices and creating its own mobile apps to ensure government services are available to citizens on any device.


For example, the new USAJobs app from the Office of Personnel Management makes it easier for job seekers to search and apply for jobs with their mobile devices, and the SaferBus app from the Department of Transportation allows users to access a bus company?s safety performance record and file a complaint from their mobile devices.


 


In order to have insight into what information the public is looking for, where they are looking for it and if they are able to find it, the government has implemented a digital analytics program.


Centralizing the management of mobile devices used by government employees and strengthen the security of government?s mobile platforms is the focus of another series of developments, including the creation of a government-wide mobile and wireless contract program that acts as a ?family plan? for the federal government and which is expected to save taxpayers $300 million over the next five years.


A new Managed Mobility Program was also created at GSA.


Final Take
Chantal Tode is associate editor on Mobile Marketer, New York

Associate Editor Chantal Tode covers advertising, messaging, legal/privacy and database/CRM. Reach her at chantal@mobilemarketer.com.


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USPS rounds out mobile offerings with BlackBerry app

By Lauren Johnson

September 24, 2011


A screen shot of the USPS BlackBerry app


The United States Postal Service is furthering its claim to make its services available on every mobile platform with a BlackBerry application.


USPS? main goal is to put the most important features of a post office on consumers? mobile devices. The BlackBerry app joins the company's other mobile offerings, which include iPhone and Android apps and a mobile-optimized Web site.


"Anything that a customer can do in a post office should eventually be available on a mobile device,? said Joseph Adams, general manager of digital access at USPS, Washington.



Simple mail
The free USPS Mobile app is available in the BlackBerry App store.


The BlackBerry version marks the fourth app that the company has rolled out in the past two years.


With the app, consumers can use GPS to find the nearest post office location and access directions.


Users can also track and confirm packages and look up?ZIP codes.


?For BlackBerry?s user base, USPS makes sense, especially for the more business-drvien services,? Mr. Adams said.


 


Consumers can find nearby postal services on the BlackBerry app


According to Mr. Adams, both the BlackBerry and Android app will soon have similar, advanced features that are currently available on the iPhone version, including pricing information.


USPS claims that the most popular feature for on-the-go consumers is tracking a package, which is why it has rolled out the specific?function on all of its apps.


Let freedom ring
USPS? BlackBerry app is the most recent example of delivery systems seeing a need for a mobile presence.


Similarly, UPS recently rolled out a new service that lets consumers control their deliveries via alerts (see story).


Additionally, FedEx used a rich-media ad to highlight shipping for the company?s golf club service (see story).


By giving consumers increased access to mail and delivery services via mobile, companies are seeing a direct need from both consumers and feeling pressure to keep up in the industry with competitors.


In the coming months, USPS.com will be relaunching its Web site to include account tracking and history.


The new Web site features will also be rolled out across mobile so that consumers can see one place where?all their activity?is located.


Between mobile and Web initiatives, USPS hopes to provide an entirely digital shipping and?mailing experience because consumers increasingly want their daily errands ? such as running to the post office ? to be made simpler on mobile devices.


?By taking our services to mobile and digital, it provides the USPS the ability to serve consumers in a way they want to be served,? Mr. Adams said.


Final Take
Lauren Johnson is editorial assistant on Mobile Marketer, New York

Lauren Johnson is associate reporter on Mobile Marketer. Reach her at lauren@mobilemarketer.com.


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Program Specialist, MPS/PHY, GS-301-7/9/11 NF (Closes: 12/12/2013)

To qualify at the GS-7 level, you must have one of the following:
1. At least one year of specialized experience equivalent to the GS-5 level in the Federal service. Examples of specialized experience include: collecting data and evaluating information, reviewing budget data to monitor expenditures, and assisting with database queries. OR
2. At least one full year of graduate level education. OR
3. Superior Academic Achievement - possession of a Bachelor's degree with one of the following: In the upper one-third of your graduating class; OR a GPA of 3.0 or higher on a 4 point scale for all course work, or based on courses completed during your final 2 years of coursework. OR
4. A combination of post high school education and experience that together meet the qualification requirements for this position.

To qualify at the GS-09, you must have one of the following:
1. At least one year of specialized experience equivalent to the GS-7 level in the Federal service. Examples of specialized experience include engaging in ongoing analysis of business processes to continually identify and recommend solutions to problems, using quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques, developing and presenting factual evidence both in writing and before an audience to support enhancements in the methods of performing work, reviewing data for trends related to business processes, interpreting those trends, and determining causes and possible courses of action. OR
2. A master`s or equivalent graduate degree or 2 full years of progressively higher level graduate education leading to such a degree. OR
3. A combination of post high school education and experience that together meet the qualification requirements for this position.

To qualify at the GS-11, you must have one of the following:
1. At least one year of specialized experience equivalent to the GS-9 level in the Federal service. Examples of specialized experience include: analyzing the effectiveness and efficiency of business operations and programmatic processes using qualitative and quantitative techniques; choosing, interpreting, or adapting guidelines for application to specific issues or subjects studied; planning and carrying out projects to improve administrative support efficiency and productivity; gathering data and analyzing, evaluating and interpreting trends to enhance work performance; completing reports and making recommendations to managers related to internal administrative operations. OR
2. A Ph.D. or equivalent doctoral degree or 3 full years of progressively higher level graduate education leading to such a degree. OR
3. A combination of post high school education and experience that together meet the qualification requirements for this position.

Education may be substituted for experience as described in "Qualifications."

You must meet eligibility and qualification requirements within 30 days of the closing date.

You must answer all job-related questions in the NSF eRecruit questionnaire.

All online applicants must provide a valid email address.  If your email address is inaccurate or your mailbox is full or blocked, you may not receive important communication that could affect your consideration for this position.

This position is in the bargaining unit.

Ratings will be assigned based on your responses to the occupational questionnaire. In some cases, additional assessment processes may be used. Review your resume and responses carefully. Responses that are not fully supported by the information in your application package may result in adjustments to your score. A Human Resources Representative will validate the qualifications of those candidates eligible to be referred to the selecting official. In the merit promotion selection process, due weight will be given to incentive awards and performance appraisals.
To preview questions please click here.


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